Non-Fiction books for the Martial Artist

man-3021551_1280.pngI enjoy martial arts (karate, silat, and kali), and picked up some books at the library on various martial arts techniques. These are books I would recommend for people who want to learn more about martial arts techniques.

  • The Advanced Shotokan Karate Bible Black Belt and Beyond by Ashley P. Marin
    • I borrowed this book primarily because it contains several sections on the application of techniques performed in katas. When I was studying karate, we did not learn the practical application of kata techniques, so to me they were nothing more than choreographed martial arts moves. While I knew that each movement had a purpose, I did not know what that purpose was. This book helped give me a general idea of the application of various kata movements.
  • Karate for Kids by Robin Rielly
    • This book is good for kids or adults who want to learn some of the basic karate techniques. If you are already hold an advanced belt in karate, this book will not benefit you.
  • Karate Techniques & Tactics, Skills for sparring and self-defense by Patrick M. Hickey
    • Of the martial arts books that I borrowed, this one so far, is my favorite. However, I borrowed this book for the “techyniques and tactics” aspect of it. I only made it part way through the book and due to Christmas break ending, I won’t be able to finish it until summer, but I have thoroughly enjoyed what I read. It starts off with a history of karate and even provides a general overview of several other similar styles of martial arts. It then introduces several martial arts stances, strikes, and kicks. From there, it moves moves into katas and sparring in competition. It was for the sections on competition, particularly sparring in a competition, that I borrowed this book.
  • Tae Kwon Do Third Edition by Yeon Hee Park, Yeon Hwan Park, and Jon Gerrard
    • I borrowed this book to read the section on sparring techniques. I honestly never got around to reading it, but I like the layout of the book. Like the The Advanced Shotokan Karate Bible and SUMO Mixed Martial Arts, this book has tons of pictures accompanied by written descriptions, and it is a book I would recommend to people interested in learning more about martial arts.
  • Sumo Mixed Martial Arts by Andrew Zerling
    • I borrowed this book to learn some of the various takedowns. This book accompanies each step with an explanation and pictures.

Books for Gardeners

The Gardener's Year  The Vegetable Gardener's Bible.jpg
For those of you who are interested in gardening, both vegetable gardens as well as flower gardens, I’ve recently been reading these two books:

  • The Gardener’s Year published by DK Publishing
    • This book contains information for both vegetable gardening and flower gardening.
  • The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible by Edward C. Smith.

I’m a novice gardener, so if you have lots of gardening experience, these books might not benefit you. But for those of us who are still learning the craft, these books are a good resource, full of useful information, tips, and tricks.

The Dangerous Book for Boys (Amazon)

DangerousBookforBoysThe Dangerous Book for Boys is a book (which I haven’t read) and a TV series created by Amazon. The TV series is entertaining and well-acted. I liked the values that the father tries to instill in his sons, particularly the main character Wyatt, who is struggling the most with his father’s passing.

This is an entertaining, light-hearted, family TV series that adults can enjoy with their children. Personally, I think it is clever how the idea for this series was created from a non-fiction, how-to book for boys. It will definitely be joining my list of TV shows to recommend to families or adults who enjoy good, clean, fun.

 

The Complete Guide to Personal Finance

The Personal Finance

The Complete Guide to Personal Finance for Teenagers and College Students by Tamsen Butler is really geared towards high schoolers. I would say it could be beneficial to college freshmen/sophomore students, but to those with more life experience it may not be beneficial. I read the book because I don’t have a good grasp of finance, and it was a little too basic even for me. It was not altogether pointless. I did learn somethings from it, but because this book is geared towards high schoolers and not really towards young adults, the information was not pertinent to me. However, it is a book I would recommend to teenagers or parents of teenagers.