Sevenfold Sword

sevenfoldswordThe Sevenfold Sword by Jonathan Moeller is the most recent series of books I’ve been enjoying. While the story is slow at times, overall it is an enjoyable read (or listen).

I really enjoy the relationship between the husband and wife. Their fidelity to each other is not a common trait seen in media these days. I also enjoy the internal conflict of the two supporting characters as they endeavor to find themselves and/or heal from past trauma.

One of the things I thought was most interesting was that when you meet the wife for the first time, she is suffering from depression as a result of the death of her infant daughter. After having withdrawn from the world for many months, she decides it is time to return to her duties. However, as she tries to fulfill her role as the Keeper of Andomhaim, she still struggles internally with her feelings of despair and depression. Throughout the early part of the story and occasionally during the latter part, you see her fighting her feelings of self-loathing and guilt as she strives to move past her grief. As someone who has struggled with depression and anxiety, I appreciated seeing a character who, despite suffering mentally, refused to be conquered by her mental illness and was still valued and respected. (I guess what I’m trying to say is I felt it showed that there was more to people with a mental illness than just the illness itself. I could see in the wife some of the thinking patterns/struggles I had experienced when I was at my lowest, and I appreciated a book that showed how it is hard to remain interested in life when life doesn’t seem worth living.)

I will be adding this book to my “favorites” list.

Note: Audible has the series broken into 3 parts, so I’m not sure how many books I’ve listened to because there was more than one in the version I bought. However, the first book in the series is called Champion.

Age of War by Michael J. Sullivan

Age of War.jpgI eagerly awaited the release of Age of War by Michael J. Sullivan. It is the third book in the Legends of the First Empire series. The book is well written, but a little slow. The characters are well developed, but overall I was disappointed.

As the title suggest, there is a lot of war and death in this book (not graphic though). There is also a lot of scheming among many characters, and no humor like in Riyria Revelations (his first, and by far his best, book series.)

Will I continue reading the book series? Yes. Will I buy the books/audio? No, I will wait for it to arrive at the library. It will also be removed from my top-10 list of  favorite book. It just doesn’t live up to the standards he created when he wrote Riyria Revelations.

Burning Tower (Benjamin Ashwood #5) by AC Cobble

Burning Tower, Benjamin Ashwood.jpgI received an advanced copy of the book in exchange for my review.

I have enjoyed the Benjamin Ashwood series in the past, but usually I listen to it on Audible. So reading the book without the benefit of a dramatized performance by Eric Michael Summerer (who narrated the first four books) was a little odd. I missed his performance.

Anyway, initially, I thought the Burning Tower was just “okay”; things seemed a little slow. However, the climax made it all worth it. I think out of all 5 books, the climax was my favorite scene. It was well-worth the wait.

I hope you enjoy reading it.

P.S. As with other Benjamin Ashwood books, there are some sex-scenes. Believe it or not, I think there were fewer in this book, then in others. I did skim over them; what I skimmed didn’t seem too terribly graphic, but as I’ve said before, I don’t like sex in books, so I tend to skip those scenes.